Why North American soccer fans should use Twitter

Twitter is the heartbeat of the North American soccer fan.

With more and more Americans becoming interested in “The Beautiful Game,” many look for as many places as possible to find solid information on the topic. Many scour the Internet to find match streams, or flip on Fox Soccer, ESPN or GolTV to watch matches. Wikipedia has been a (surprisingly) reliable source when it comes to club histories and match and table information. But beyond these and general soccer news sites, where is the budding fan to go to get their fix?

Having interacted with many newer soccer fans, these people are typically quite interested to soak up as much information as their brains can handle. This can be great, but utilizing the aforementioned outlets can only get a fan so much.

Okay, so you’ve found your club, and you’ve bought your scarf and kit. You’ve read the leagues Wikipedia page, as well as the one dedicated to your beloved club. Where to now? It can be difficult for the new fan to get in with a group of like-minded individuals, especially if there isn’t anyone in their group of friends that likes the same club they do. Well, there is an answer.

Twitter.

Now, there are a lot of stereotypes about the social network that turn many off to it, but if a person is a soccer fan looking to learn more about the culture and inner workings of the way a supporter’s group operates, Twitter is the place to do it. Having been a fanatic since long before the service was available, it amazes me still how I was able to get by on the little information that was available to me before things like Twitter.

Twitter allows for fans to connect with other fans of their club that wasn’t previously available unless they were in the pub next to the ground every day. It really is that good. Whether you are a fan of a MLS club, a Premier League follower or any of the many top leagues around the world, odds are there’s like-minded individuals on Twitter in the thousands. This is the ultimate tool for banter about who should start, why a player is playing like crap, the latest club news, etc.

QPR midfielder Joey Barton is just one of the countless footballers who speak freely on Twitter.

But the best thing about the social networking site is the connections that can be made in one’s supporter base. To be able to find multiple people in multiple countries who are all in the same position that you are is priceless. There is nothing better. Also, the ability to see what is on the player’s minds adds a very personal face to the game that was just not possible before.

In this day and age, a fan who is new to the game just cannot get as well-rounded of an introduction as they can on Twitter. For all of the site’s flaws, this is the biggest pro, and it certainly outweighs any negative that can be conceived. Whether the fan picked the game up last week, or have been a fan for a couple of years, it may be exactly what a person is looking for.

Sign up. Search your clubs’ name and start adding supporters. Without regular interaction with fellow club supporters, the person in question is robbing themselves of a very important opportunity. Only by learning about other supporters’ experiences, difficulties and joys can a person really understand why supporting their side is better than anything else.

If you still don’t believe it, sign up. Try it for a week. If you still aren’t convinced, i’ll buy you a pint if I run into you at the pub. That’s a promise.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by colin on 09/16/2011 at 11:00

    you’ll buy me a pint if i sign up for twitter?

    Reply

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